Cool Small Simple House Design images

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John Waddey Carter House 1
small simple house design
Image by David V. Hoffman
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[This is one of a set of 8 photos} The John Waddey Carter House in Martinsville, Virginia, was built in 1896; the architect was George Franklin Barber, mail-order architect from Knoxville, Tennessee. This was a wedding present for Carter’s second wife, Kizziah Drewery. Locally the house is known as the “Gray Lady.” Carter was a lawyer and politician, one-time mayor of Martinsville.

A somewhat subdued Barber design, this is still a remarkable Queen Anne with architectural features galore. It’s a 2-story frame weatherboard structure with a dominating central gable, under which are found porches on both first and second floors. The roofline is complex with the front gable, steep-pitched cross gables, and a tower with onion dome. The roof is hipped, standing-seam metal-clad. A large dormer window is on the side with narrow double windows. Running bond brick forms the foundation.

The first level front façade has a wrap-around porch that contains the bulge of the tower. It has a frieze of beaded spindlework, turned posts and lace brackets, and a balustrade consisting of thick balusters but with panels at the corners. The porch gable has a board-and-batten decoration and a very basic bargeboard. The second-level porch has more involved ornamentation with a base of fish-scale shingles, a wide, subdued bargeboard, and stylized floral corner medallions. The central gable is decorated with fish-scale shingles and has two small 1/1 windows, the upper portions with a design of diagonal muntins.

The octagonal tower is more a part of the mass of the house rather than a taller, more prominent element. Fish-scale shingles form the base of the tower above the roofline; above this are small sunburst windows; and above the windows is an overhang with prominent brackets. Capping the tower is a small onion-dome with patterned metal shingles. A variety of windows exists throughout—tall but narrow 1/1 paned windows, single-paned, round, half-round, arched, and stained glass (I didn’t spot this). The entrance is simple with large sidelights and a decorative sunburst pattern below them.

Modifications have been made to the original house to accommodate additions of a bathroom and kitchen.

The house was listed November 3, 1988 on the National Register of Historic Places with ID #88002180. The Virginia Department of Historic Resources nomination file includes a very detailed account of the interior arrangement and decorative elements.

www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Martinsville/120-00…

A nice b&w photo (no date given) at
www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Martinsville/Carter…

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Westmerton 1
small simple house design
Image by David V. Hoffman
[There are 3 images in the Westmerton set] This is a creative commons image, which you may freely use by linking to this page. Please respect the photographer and his work.

Westmerton, a Italianate home from 1856 was designed and built by Hampden-Sydney minister and one-time chaplain to Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898). During the last years of the Civil War, Stonewall Jackson’s wife sought refuge here (she was related to Dabney’s wife). When Yankee forces were approaching the area, Rev. Dabney hid a manuscript of the biography of Stonewall Jackson which he had written and completed in 1864. The home has brick foundation and walls. The roof is low-pitched and made of tin; the chimneys are large and it appears they are placed both internally and externally. The eaves are wide and supported by simple brackets. The front gable has the pediment form and the first-floor window and door have prominent hoods. A small arcade connects that portion of the house with the section containing a bay window (I assume this is an addition). The red and white make an attractive combination for this relatively unadorned structure. This is called the Dabney House in the nomination form submitted to the National Register of Historic Places (as part of Hampden-Sydney College Historic District). The NHRP ID for the district is #70000822 and was added 02-26-70.

For a biography for Dabney see
virginiahuguenot.blogspot.com/2010/08/architect-of-orthod…

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Kenmare, Indiana–mailed Oct 23, 1907–[post card 79]
small simple house design
Image by David V. Hoffman
This is a creative commons image, which you may freely use by linking to this page. Please respect the photographer and his work.

The date of this house is unknown. I’d guess the late 19th century. I’ve been totally unsuccessful trying to locate Kenmare, Indiana. This is a real photo post card of someone’s home, somewhere. It was frequently the habit during the heyday of the post card (roughly 1900-1912) for a home owner to buy photo post cards and send them to friends and relatives. Often itinerant but enterprising photographers traveled from town to town, taking photos and then offering to sell cards to prospective clients. This 2-story wood frame Victorian home has a steep-pitched roof with cross-gables. One slender chimney is visible. Both the gable on the front façade and the end gable are decorated with lacy millwork. In the front gable, a fringe-like pattern in the wood seems a dividing point between gable and the bay projection underneath. Two stained glass windows are shown—a solitary rectangular light above the entry porch and another, which functions as a transom above the bottommost window in the bay. Both appear to show a floral and geometric design as was common in much domestic stained glass of the period. The porch is small with one column turned and 2 half-columns supporting the small roof. The door is placed at an angle below where the two gables cross. It is wood with a single light in the upper portion and raised panels in the bottom. I’m not certain about what occupies the place of the transom above the entrance. The structure has corner posts from ground to eaves. It’s easy to imagine a house like this in two colors, as was often stylish then. A woman in dark dress is posing on the porch. The fence around the house is simple–wood with wire.

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